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Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

Parenting interventions for people with schizophrenia or related serious mental illness

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, October 2021
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
29 tweeters

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
48 Mendeley
Title
Parenting interventions for people with schizophrenia or related serious mental illness
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, October 2021
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd013536.pub2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jessica Radley, Claire Grant, Jane Barlow, Louise Johns

Abstract

Around a third of people with schizophrenia or related serious mental illness will be a parent. Both the parents and the children in this population are at increased risk of adverse outcomes due to parental mental illness. Parenting interventions are known to improve parenting skills and decrease child disruptive behaviour. This systematic review aimed to synthesise the evidence base for parenting interventions designed specifically for parents who have schizophrenia or related serious mental illness. To assess the effects of parenting interventions for people with schizophrenia or related serious mental illness. On 10 February 2021 we searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group's Study-Based Register of Trials, which is based on the following: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), ClinicalTrials.Gov, Embase, International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number (ISRCTN), MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PubMed, and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform. Eligible studies were randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared parenting interventions with a control condition for people with schizophrenia or related serious mental illness with a child between the ages of 0 and 18 years. We independently inspected citations, selected studies, extracted data and appraised study quality. We assessed risk of bias for included studies. We only included one trial (n = 50), and it was not possible to extract any data because the authors did not provide any means and standard deviations for our outcomes of interest; they only reported whether outcomes were significant or not at the 0.05 level. Three domains of the trial were rated as having a high risk of bias. The only included trial provided inconclusive evidence. There is insufficient evidence to make recommendations to people with schizophrenia (or related serious mental illness) or clinicians, or for policy changes. Although there is no RCT evidence, parenting interventions for people with schizophrenia or related serious mental illness have been developed. Future research should test these in RCTs in order to improve the evidence base for this population.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 29 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 48 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 5 10%
Student > Master 5 10%
Other 3 6%
Researcher 3 6%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 6%
Other 5 10%
Unknown 24 50%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 9 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 13%
Psychology 2 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 2%
Unspecified 1 2%
Other 3 6%
Unknown 26 54%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 18. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 October 2022.
All research outputs
#1,689,228
of 22,515,079 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#3,826
of 12,267 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#47,962
of 426,979 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#29
of 51 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,515,079 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 12,267 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 30.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 426,979 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 51 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.