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Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

Psychosocial group interventions to improve psychological well-being in adults living with HIV

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, March 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

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17 tweeters
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4 Facebook pages
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

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31 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
512 Mendeley
Title
Psychosocial group interventions to improve psychological well-being in adults living with HIV
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, March 2017
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd010806.pub2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ingrid van der Heijden, Naeemah Abrahams, David Sinclair

Abstract

Being diagnosed with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and labelled with a chronic, life-threatening, and often stigmatizing disease, can impact on a person's well-being. Psychosocial group interventions aim to improve life-functioning and coping as individuals adjust to the diagnosis. To examine the effectiveness of psychosocial group interventions for improving the psychological well-being of adults living with HIV/AIDS. We searched the following electronic databases up to 14 March 2016: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) published in the Cochrane Library (Issue 2, 2016), PubMed (MEDLINE) (1996 to 14 March 2016), Embase (1996 to 14 March 2016), and Clinical Trials.gov. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs that compared psychosocial group interventions with versus control (standard care or brief educational interventions), with at least three months follow-up post-intervention. We included trials that reported measures of depression, anxiety, stress, or coping using standardized scales. Two review authors independently screened abstracts, applied the inclusion criteria, and extracted data. We compared continuous outcomes using mean differences (MD) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs), and pooled data using a random-effects model. When the included trials used different measurement scales, we pooled data using standardized mean difference (SMD) values. We reported trials that we could not include in the meta analysis narratively in the text. We assessed the certainty of the evidence using the GRADE approach. We included 16 trials (19 articles) that enrolled 2520 adults living with HIV. All the interventions were multifaceted and included a mix of psychotherapy, relaxation, group support, and education. The included trials were conducted in the USA (12 trials), Canada (one trial), Switzerland (one trial), Uganda (one trial), and South Africa (one trial), and published between 1996 and 2016. Ten trials recruited men and women, four trials recruited homosexual men, and two trials recruited women only. Interventions were conducted with groups of four to 15 people, for 90 to 135 minutes, every week for up to 12 weeks. All interventions were conducted face-to-face except two, which were delivered by telephone. All were delivered by graduate or postgraduate trained health, psychology, or social care professionals except one that used a lay community health worker and two that used trained mindfulness practitioners.Group-based psychosocial interventions based on cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) may have a small effect on measures of depression, and this effect may last for up to 15 months after participation in the group sessions (SMD -0.26, 95% CI -0.42 to -0.10; 1139 participants, 10 trials, low certainty evidence). Most trials used the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), which has a maximum score of 63, and the mean score in the intervention groups was around 1.4 points lower at the end of follow-up. This small benefit was consistent across five trials where participants had a mean depression score in the normal range at baseline, but trials where the mean score was in the depression range at baseline effects were less consistent. Fewer trials reported measures of anxiety, where there may be little or no effect (four trials, 471 participants, low certainty evidence), stress, where there may be little or no effect (five trials, 507 participants, low certainty evidence), and coping (five trials, 697 participants, low certainty evidence).Group-based interventions based on mindfulness have not demonstrated effects on measures of depression (SMD -0.23, 95% CI -0.49 to 0.03; 233 participants, 2 trials, very low certainty evidence), anxiety (SMD -0.16, 95% CI -0.47 to 0.15; 62 participants, 2 trials, very low certainty evidence), or stress (MD -2.02, 95% CI -4.23 to 0.19; 137 participants, 2 trials, very low certainty evidence). No mindfulness based interventions included in the studies had any valid measurements of coping. Group-based psychosocial interventions may have a small effect on measures of depression, but the clinical importance of this is unclear. More high quality evidence is needed to assess whether group psychosocial intervention improve psychological well-being in HIV positive adults.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 17 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 512 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Singapore 1 <1%
Unknown 511 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 89 17%
Researcher 62 12%
Student > Bachelor 58 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 54 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 32 6%
Other 94 18%
Unknown 123 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 109 21%
Psychology 97 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 69 13%
Social Sciences 37 7%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 15 3%
Other 47 9%
Unknown 138 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 May 2021.
All research outputs
#1,858,871
of 21,105,374 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#4,217
of 12,078 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#38,030
of 276,541 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#110
of 261 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,105,374 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 12,078 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 28.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,541 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 261 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.