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Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

Chelation for autism spectrum disorder (ASD)

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
twitter
42 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
q&a
1 Q&A thread
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
39 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
200 Mendeley
Title
Chelation for autism spectrum disorder (ASD)
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, May 2015
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd010766.pub2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Stephen James, Shawn W Stevenson, Natalie Silove, Katrina Williams

Abstract

It has been suggested that the severity of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) symptoms is positively correlated with the level of circulating or stored toxic metals, and that excretion of these heavy metals, brought about by the use of pharmaceutical chelating agents, results in improved symptoms. To assess the potential benefits and adverse effects of pharmaceutical chelating agents (referred to as chelation therapy throughout this review) for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) symptoms. We searched the following databases on 6 November 2014: CENTRAL, Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process, Embase, PsycINFO, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) and 15 other databases, including three trials registers. In addition we checked references lists and contacted experts. All randomised controlled trials of pharmaceutical chelating agents compared with placebo in individuals with ASD. Two review authors independently selected studies, assessed them for risk of bias and extracted relevant data. We did not conduct a meta-analysis, as only one study was included. We excluded nine studies because they were non-randomised trials or were withdrawn before enrolment. We included one study, which was conducted in two phases. During the first phase of the study, 77 children with ASD were randomly assigned to receive seven days of glutathione lotion or placebo lotion, followed by three days of oral dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA). Forty-nine children who were found to be high excreters of heavy metals during phase one continued on to phase two to receive three days of oral DMSA or placebo followed by 11 days off, with the cycle repeated up to six times. The second phase thus assessed the effectiveness of multiple doses of oral DMSA compared with placebo in children who were high excreters of heavy metals and who received a three-day course of oral DMSA. Overall, no evidence suggests that multiple rounds of oral DMSA had an effect on ASD symptoms. This review included data from only one study, which had methodological limitations. As such, no clinical trial evidence was found to suggest that pharmaceutical chelation is an effective intervention for ASD. Given prior reports of serious adverse events, such as hypocalcaemia, renal impairment and reported death, the risks of using chelation for ASD currently outweigh proven benefits. Before further trials are conducted, evidence that supports a causal link between heavy metals and autism and methods that ensure the safety of participants are needed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 42 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 200 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Unknown 198 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 33 17%
Student > Master 32 16%
Researcher 20 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 10%
Student > Postgraduate 11 6%
Other 36 18%
Unknown 49 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 51 26%
Nursing and Health Professions 29 14%
Psychology 20 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 5%
Social Sciences 6 3%
Other 31 16%
Unknown 54 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 74. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 September 2020.
All research outputs
#351,400
of 17,664,715 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#760
of 11,730 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,602
of 238,054 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#23
of 240 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,664,715 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,730 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 25.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 238,054 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 240 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.