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Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

Carbamazepine versus valproate monotherapy for epilepsy

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, July 2000
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source

Citations

dimensions_citation
78 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
71 Mendeley
Title
Carbamazepine versus valproate monotherapy for epilepsy
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, July 2000
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd001030
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anthony G Marson, Paula R Williamson, Jane L Hutton, Helen E Clough, David W Chadwick

Abstract

Carbamazepine and valproate are drugs of first choice for epilepsy. Despite the lack of hard evidence from individual randomized controlled trials, there is strong clinical belief that valproate is the drug of choice for generalized epilepsies and carbamazepine for partial epilepsies. To overview the best evidence comparing carbamazepine and valproate monotherapy Our search strategy included: (a) MEDLINE 1966-99, (b) The Cochrane Library 1999 issue 4, (c) The trial register of the Cochrane Epilepsy Group (d) the pharmaceutical industry. Randomized controlled trials comparing carbamazepine and valproate monotherapy for epilepsy. This was an individual patient data review. Outcome measures were time to withdrawal of allocated treatment, time to 12 month remission, and time to first seizure post randomization. Data were analysed using the stratified Logrank test with results expressed as hazard ratios (HR) (95% CI), where HR>1 indicates an event is more likely on valproate. A test for an interaction between treatment and epilepsy type (partial versus generalized) was also undertaken. Results Data were available for 1265 patients from five trials, representing 85% of the patients recruited into the eight trials that met our inclusion criteria. The main overall results (HR 95% CI) were: Time to treatment withdrawal 0.97 (0.79-1.18), 12 month remission 0.87 (0.74-1.02), first seizure 1.09 (0.96-1.25) suggesting no overall difference for these outcomes. The test for an interaction between treatment and epilepsy type was non significant for time to treatment withdrawal and 12 month remission, but significant for time to first seizure. The age distribution of adults classified as having a generalized epilepsy indicate that significant numbers of patients may have had their epilepsy misclassified. We have found some evidence to support the policy of using carbamazepine as the first treatment of choice in partial epilepsies, but no evidence to support the choice of valproate in generalized epilepsies, but confidence intervals are too wide to confirm equivalence. Misclassification of patients may have confounded our results, and has important implications for the design and conduct of future trials.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 71 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Unknown 70 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 10 14%
Student > Postgraduate 9 13%
Student > Master 8 11%
Researcher 7 10%
Other 6 8%
Other 18 25%
Unknown 13 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 30 42%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 7 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 6%
Chemical Engineering 1 1%
Other 8 11%
Unknown 16 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2007.
All research outputs
#2,039,751
of 8,090,406 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#5,744
of 8,735 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#83,648
of 259,210 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#90
of 139 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,090,406 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 61st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,735 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.8. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 259,210 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 139 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.