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Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

Anti‐vascular endothelial growth factor for choroidal neovascularisation in people with pathological myopia

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, December 2016
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (51st percentile)

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Citations

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177 Mendeley
Title
Anti‐vascular endothelial growth factor for choroidal neovascularisation in people with pathological myopia
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, December 2016
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd011160.pub2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ying Zhu, Ting Zhang, Gezhi Xu, Lijun Peng

Abstract

Choroidal neovascularisation (CNV) is a common complication of pathological myopia. Once developed, most eyes with myopic CNV (mCNV) experience a progression to macular atrophy, which leads to irreversible vision loss. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) therapy is used to treat diseases characterised by neovascularisation and is increasingly used to treat mCNV. To assess the effects of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) therapy for choroidal neovascularisation (CNV), compared with other treatments, sham treatment or no treatment, in people with pathological myopia. We searched a number of electronic databases including CENTRAL and Ovid MEDLINE, ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform ICTRP). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. Electronic databases were last searched on 16 June 2016. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs comparing anti-VEGF therapy with another treatment (e.g. photodynamic therapy (PDT) with verteporfin, laser photocoagulation, macular surgery, another anti-VEGF), sham treatment or no treatment in participants with mCNV. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. Two authors independently screened records, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias. We contacted trial authors for additional data. We analysed outcomes as risk ratios (RRs) or mean differences (MDs). We graded the certainty of the evidence using GRADE. The present review included six studies which provided data on the comparison between anti-VEGF with PDT, laser, sham treatment and another anti-VEGF treatment, with 594 participants with mCNV. Three trials compared bevacizumab or ranibizumab with PDT, one trial compared bevacizumab with laser, one trial compared aflibercept with sham treatment, and two trials compared bevacizumab with ranibizumab. Pharmaceutical companies conducted two trials. The trials were conducted at multiple clinical centres across three continents (Europe, Asia and North America). In all these six trials, one eye for each participant was included in the study.When compared with PDT, people treated with anti-VEGF agents (ranibizumab (one RCT), bevacizumab (two RCTs)), were more likely to regain vision. At one year of follow-up, the mean visual acuity (VA) in participants treated with anti-VEGFs was -0.14 logMAR better, equivalent of seven Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) letters, compared with people treated with PDT (95% confidence interval (CI) -0.20 to -0.08, 3 RCTs, 263 people, low-certainty evidence). The RR for proportion of participants gaining 3+ lines of VA was 1.86 (95% CI 1.27 to 2.73, 2 RCTs, 226 people, moderate-certainty evidence). At two years, the mean VA in people treated with anti-VEGFs was -0.26 logMAR better, equivalent of 13 ETDRS letters, compared with people treated with PDT (95% CI -0.38 to -0.14, 2 RCTs, 92 people, low-certainty evidence). The RR for proportion of people gaining 3+ lines of VA at two years was 3.43 (95% CI 1.37 to 8.56, 2 RCTs, 92 people, low-certainty evidence). People treated with anti-VEGFs showed no obvious reduction (improvement) in central retinal thickness at one year compared with people treated with PDT (MD -17.84 μm, 95% CI -41.98 to 6.30, 2 RCTs, 226 people, moderate-certainty evidence). There was low-certainty evidence that people treated with anti-VEGF were more likely to have CNV angiographic closure at 1 year (RR 1.24, 95% CI 0.99 to 1.54, 2 RCTs, 208 people). One study allowed ranibizumab treatment as of month 3 in participants randomised to PDT, which may have led to an underestimate of the benefits of anti-VEGF treatment.When compared with laser photocoagulation, there was more improvement in VA among bevacizumab-treated people than among laser-treated people after one year (MD -0.22 logMAR, equivalent of 11 ETDRS letters, 95% CI -0.43 to -0.01, 1 RCT, 36 people, low-certainty evidence) and after two years (MD -0.29 logMAR, equivalent of 14 ETDRS letters, 95% CI -0.50 to -0.08, 1 RCT, 36 people, low-certainty evidence).When compared with sham treatment, people treated with aflibercept had better vision at one year (MD -0.19 logMAR, equivalent of 9 ETDRS letters, 95% CI -0.27 to -0.12, 1 RCT, 121 people, moderate-certainty evidence). The fact that this study allowed for aflibercept treatment at 6 months in the control group might cause an underestimation of the benefit with anti-VEGF.People treated with ranibizumab had similar improvement in VA recovery compared with people treated with bevacizumab after one year (MD -0.02 logMAR, equivalent of 1 ETDRS letter, 95% CI -0.11 to 0.06, 2 RCTs, 80 people, moderate-certainty evidence).Of the included six studies, two studies reported no adverse events in either group and two industry-sponsored studies reported both systemic and ocular adverse events. In the control group, there were no systemic or ocular adverse events reported in 149 participants. Fifteen people reported systemic serious adverse events among 359 people treated with anti-VEGF agents (15/359, 4.2%). Five people reported ocular adverse events among 359 people treated with anti-VEGF agents (5/359, 1.4%). The number of adverse events was low, and the estimate of RR was uncertain regarding systemic serious adverse events (4 RCTs, 15 events in 508 people, RR 4.50, 95% CI 0.60 to 33.99, very low-certainty evidence) and serious ocular adverse events (4 RCTs, 5 events in 508 people, RR 1.82, 95% CI 0.23 to 14.71, very low-certainty evidence). There were no reports of mortality or cases of endophthalmitis or retinal detachment.There was sparse reporting of data for vision-related quality of life (in favour of anti-VEGF) in only one trial at one year of follow-up. The studies did not report data for other outcomes, such as percentage of participants with newly developed chorioretinal atrophy. There is low to moderate-certainty evidence from RCTs for the efficacy of anti-VEGF agents to treat mCNV at one year and two years. Moderate-certainty evidence suggests ranibizumab and bevacizumab are equivalent in terms of efficacy. Adverse effects occurred rarely and the trials included here were underpowered to assess these. Future research should be focused on the efficacy and safety of different drugs and treatment regimens, the efficacy on different location of mCNV, as well as the effects on practice in the real world.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 177 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 177 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 27 15%
Student > Bachelor 15 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 8%
Researcher 13 7%
Other 12 7%
Other 36 20%
Unknown 60 34%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 57 32%
Nursing and Health Professions 17 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 3%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 4 2%
Psychology 4 2%
Other 19 11%
Unknown 70 40%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 February 2022.
All research outputs
#3,181,243
of 26,109,760 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#5,787
of 13,185 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#57,683
of 425,431 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#130
of 266 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 26,109,760 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 13,185 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 35.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 425,431 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 266 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.