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Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

Low-molecular-weight heparins for managing vaso-occlusive crises in people with sickle cell disease

Overview of attention for article published in this source, June 2013
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1 policy source
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4 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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Readers on

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35 Mendeley
Title
Low-molecular-weight heparins for managing vaso-occlusive crises in people with sickle cell disease
Published by
John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, June 2013
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd010155.pub2
Pubmed ID
Authors

van Zuuren, Esther J, Fedorowicz, Zbys

Abstract

Sickle cell disease is one of the most common and severe genetic disorders in the world. It can be broadly divided into two distinct clinical phenotypes characterized by either haemolysis or vaso-occlusion. Pain is the most prominent symptom of vaso-occlusion, and hypercoagulability is a well-established pathogenic phenomenon in people with sickle cell disease. Low-molecular-weight heparins might control this hypercoagulable state through their anticoagulant effect.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 35 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 3%
Netherlands 1 3%
Denmark 1 3%
Canada 1 3%
Unknown 31 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 14%
Student > Bachelor 5 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 11%
Student > Master 4 11%
Other 9 26%
Unknown 2 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 51%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 9%
Psychology 3 9%
Chemistry 2 6%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 2 6%