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Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

Antibiotics for asymptomatic bacteriuria in kidney transplant recipients

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, February 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
46 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
46 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
125 Mendeley
Title
Antibiotics for asymptomatic bacteriuria in kidney transplant recipients
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, February 2018
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd011357.pub2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Julien Coussement, Anne Scemla, Daniel Abramowicz, Evi V Nagler, Angela C Webster

Abstract

Asymptomatic bacteriuria, defined as bacteriuria without signs or symptoms of urinary tract infection (UTI), occurs in 17% to 51% of kidney transplant recipients and is thought to increase the risk for a subsequent UTI. No consensus exists on the role of antibiotics for asymptomatic bacteriuria in kidney transplantation. To assess the benefits and harms of treating asymptomatic bacteriuria in kidney transplant recipients with antimicrobial agents to prevent symptomatic UTI, all-cause mortality and the indirect effects of UTI (acute rejection, graft loss, worsening of graft function). We searched the Cochrane Kidney and Transplant Register of Studies up to 1 September 2017 through contact with the Information Specialist using search terms relevant to this review. Studies in the Register are identified through searches of CENTRAL, MEDLINE, and EMBASE, conference proceedings, the International Clinical Trials Register (ICTRP) Search Portal, and ClinicalTrials.gov. All randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs in any language assessing treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria in kidney transplant recipients at any time-point after transplantation. Two authors independently determined study eligibility, assessed quality and extracted data. Primary outcomes were incidence of symptomatic UTI and incidence of antimicrobial resistance. Other outcomes included incidences of all-cause mortality, graft loss, graft rejection, graft function, hospitalisation for UTI, adverse reactions to antimicrobial agents and relapse or persistence of asymptomatic bacteriuria. We expressed dichotomous outcomes as absolute risk difference (RD) or risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) and continuous data as mean differences (MD) with 95% CI. Data were pooled using the random effects model. We included two studies (212 participants) comparing antibiotics versus no treatment, and identified three on-going studies. Overall, incidence of symptomatic UTI varied between 19% and 31% in the groups not treated for asymptomatic bacteriuria. Antibiotic treatment had uncertain effects on preventing symptomatic UTI (2 studies, 200 participants: RR 0.86, 95% CI 0.51 to 1.45). Risk for selecting multidrug-resistant organisms was uncertain with antibiotic treatment (1 study, 112 participants: RR 1.21, 95% CI 0.60 to 2.41). Persistence of asymptomatic bacteriuria was high regardless of treatment. Antibiotics also have uncertain effects on other important patient and graft outcomes, for instance on all-cause mortality (1 study, 112 participants: RR 2.23, 95% CI 0.21 to 23.86), graft loss (1 study, 112 participants: RR 1.11, 95% CI 0.07 to 17.36), acute rejection (1 study, 112 participants: RR 0.93, 95% CI 0.44 to 1.97), hospitalisation for UTI (1 study, 112 participants: RR 0.74, 95% CI 0.13 to 4.27), graft function (2 studies, 200 participants, MD in serum creatinine concentration -0.06 mg/dL, 95% CI -0.19 to 0.08) and adverse reactions (1 study, 112 participants: no severe adverse event attributable to the antibiotic treatment). Evidence quality was low for all outcomes. Currently, there is insufficient evidence to support routinely treating kidney transplant recipients with antibiotics in case of asymptomatic bacteriuria after transplantation, but data are scarce. Further studies assessing routine antibiotic treatment would inform practice and we await the results of three ongoing randomised studies, which may help resolve existing uncertainties.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 46 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 125 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 125 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 19 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 10%
Student > Bachelor 13 10%
Other 10 8%
Researcher 7 6%
Other 20 16%
Unknown 43 34%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 39 31%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 5%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 6 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 4%
Psychology 5 4%
Other 13 10%
Unknown 51 41%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 45. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 April 2022.
All research outputs
#758,052
of 22,330,240 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#1,609
of 12,238 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#20,083
of 405,539 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#51
of 216 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,330,240 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 12,238 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 30.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 405,539 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 216 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.