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Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

Hydrogel dressings for treating pressure ulcers

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, February 2015
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Title
Hydrogel dressings for treating pressure ulcers
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, February 2015
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd011226.pub2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jo C Dumville, Nikki Stubbs, Samantha J Keogh, Rachel M Walker, Zhenmi Liu

Abstract

Pressure ulcers, also known as bedsores, decubitus ulcers and pressure injuries, are localised areas of injury to the skin or the underlying tissue, or both. Dressings are widely used to treat pressure ulcers and there are many different dressing options including hydrogel dressings. A clear and current overview of the current evidence is required to facilitate decision-making regarding dressing use for the treatment of pressure ulcers. To assess the effects of hydrogel dressings on the healing of pressure ulcers in any care setting. We searched the following databases: the Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (searched 19 June 2014); The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014, Issue 5); Ovid MEDLINE (1946 to June Week 2 2014); Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, 23 June 2014); Ovid EMBASE (1974 to 20 June 2014); and EBSCO CINAHL (1982 to 18 June 2014). There were no restrictions based on language or date of publication. Published or unpublished randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the effects of hydrogel dressings with alternative wound dressings or no dressing in the treatment of pressure ulcers (stage II or above). Two review authors independently performed study selection, risk of bias assessment and data extraction. We included eleven studies (523 participants) in this review. Ten studies had two arms and one had three arms that were all relevant to this review. Three studies compared a hydrogel dressing with a basic wound contact dressing; three studies compared a hydrogel dressing with a hydrocolloid dressing; three studies compared a hydrogel dressing with another hydrogel dressing; one study compared a hydrogel dressing with a foam dressing; one study compared a hydrogel dressing with a dextranomer paste dressing and one study compared a hydrogel dressing with a topical treatment (collagenase). Limited data were available for analyses in this review: we conducted no meta-analyses. Where data were available there was no evidence of a difference between hydrogel and alternative treatments in terms of complete wound healing or adverse events. One small study reported that using hydrogel dressings was, on average, less costly than hydrocolloid dressings, but this estimate was imprecise and its methodology was not clear. All included studies were small, had short follow-up times and were at unclear risk of bias. It is not clear if hydrogel dressings are more or less effective than other treatments in healing pressure ulcers or if different hydrogels have different effects, Most trials in this field are very small and poorly reported so that risk of bias is unclear.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 204 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Unknown 201 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 46 23%
Student > Bachelor 28 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 10%
Researcher 17 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 14 7%
Other 36 18%
Unknown 42 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 56 27%
Nursing and Health Professions 37 18%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 11 5%
Psychology 10 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 3%
Other 35 17%
Unknown 48 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 March 2015.
All research outputs
#15,899,896
of 19,791,698 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#11,043
of 11,961 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#162,483
of 227,463 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#234
of 251 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,791,698 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,961 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 27.7. This one is in the 2nd percentile – i.e., 2% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 227,463 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 251 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 3rd percentile – i.e., 3% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.