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Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

Haemostatic therapies for acute spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, April 2018
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
7 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

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41 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
146 Mendeley
Title
Haemostatic therapies for acute spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, April 2018
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd005951.pub4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rustam Al-Shahi Salman, Zhe Kang Law, Philip M Bath, Thorsten Steiner, Nikola Sprigg

Abstract

Outcome after spontaneous (non-traumatic) intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) is influenced by haematoma volume; up to one-third of ICHs enlarge within 24 hours of onset. Early haemostatic therapy might improve outcome by limiting haematoma growth. This is an update of a Cochrane Review first published in 2006, and last updated in 2009. To examine 1) the effectiveness and safety of individual classes of haemostatic therapies, compared against placebo or open control, in adults with acute spontaneous intracerebral haemorrhage, and 2) the effects of each class of haemostatic therapy according to the type of antithrombotic drug taken immediately before ICH onset (i.e. anticoagulant, antiplatelet, or none). We searched the Cochrane Stroke Trials Register, CENTRAL; 2017, Issue 11, MEDLINE Ovid, and Embase Ovid on 27 November 2017. In an effort to identify further published, ongoing, and unpublished randomised controlled trials (RCT), we scanned bibliographies of relevant articles and searched international registers of RCTs in November 2017. We sought randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of any haemostatic intervention (i.e. pro-coagulant treatments such as coagulation factors, antifibrinolytic drugs, or platelet transfusion) for acute spontaneous ICH, compared with placebo, open control, or an active comparator, reporting relevant clinical outcome measures. Two authors independently extracted data, assessed risk of bias, and contacted corresponding authors of eligible RCTs for specific data if they were not provided in the published report of an RCT. We included 12 RCTs involving 1732 participants. There were seven RCTs of blood clotting factors versus placebo or open control involving 1480 participants, three RCTs of antifibrinolytic drugs versus placebo or open control involving 57 participants, one RCT of platelet transfusion versus open control involving 190 participants, and one RCT of blood clotting factors versus fresh frozen plasma involving five participants. We were unable to include two eligible RCTs because they presented aggregate data for adults with ICH and other types of intracranial haemorrhage. We identified 10 ongoing RCTs. Across all seven criteria in the 12 included RCTs, the risk of bias was unclear in 37 (44%), high in 16 (19%), and low in 31 (37%). Only one RCT was at low risk of bias in all criteria.In one RCT of platelet transfusion versus open control for acute spontaneous ICH associated with antiplatelet drug use, there was a significant increase in death or dependence (modified Rankin Scale score 4 to 6) at day 90 (70/97 versus 52/93; risk ratio (RR) 1.29, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04 to 1.61, one trial, 190 participants, moderate-quality evidence). All findings were non-significant for blood clotting factors versus placebo or open control for acute spontaneous ICH with or without surgery (moderate-quality evidence), for antifibrinolytic drugs versus placebo (moderate-quality evidence) or open control for acute spontaneous ICH (moderate-quality evidence), and for clotting factors versus fresh frozen plasma for acute spontaneous ICH associated with anticoagulant drug use (no evidence). Based on moderate-quality evidence from one trial, platelet transfusion seems hazardous in comparison to standard care for adults with antiplatelet-associated ICH.We were unable to draw firm conclusions about the efficacy and safety of blood clotting factors for acute spontaneous ICH with or without surgery, antifibrinolytic drugs for acute spontaneous ICH, and clotting factors versus fresh frozen plasma for acute spontaneous ICH associated with anticoagulant drug use.Further RCTs are warranted, and we await the results of the 10 ongoing RCTs with interest.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 146 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 146 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 25 17%
Student > Bachelor 17 12%
Researcher 15 10%
Other 9 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 6%
Other 24 16%
Unknown 47 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 38 26%
Nursing and Health Professions 14 10%
Neuroscience 8 5%
Psychology 6 4%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 3%
Other 14 10%
Unknown 61 42%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 November 2019.
All research outputs
#1,945,627
of 21,795,229 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#4,313
of 12,114 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#42,787
of 299,197 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#99
of 192 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,795,229 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 12,114 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 29.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 299,197 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 192 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.