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Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

Effect of administration of antihelminthics for soil-transmitted helminths during pregnancy

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, June 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
3 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
47 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
232 Mendeley
Title
Effect of administration of antihelminthics for soil-transmitted helminths during pregnancy
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, June 2015
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd005547.pub3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rehana A Salam, Batool A Haider, Quratulain Humayun, Zulfiqar A Bhutta

Abstract

Helminthiasis is infestation of the human body with parasitic worms and it is estimated to affect 44 million pregnancies, globally, each year. Intestinal helminthiasis (hook worm) is associated with blood loss and decreased supply of nutrients for erythropoiesis, resulting in iron-deficiency anaemia. Over 50% of the pregnant women in low- and middle-income countries suffer from iron-deficiency anaemia. Though iron-deficiency anaemia is multifactorial, hook worm infestation is a major contributory cause in women of reproductive age in endemic areas. Antihelminthics are highly efficacious in treating hook worm but evidence of their beneficial effect and safety, when given during pregnancy, has not been established. To determine the effects of administration of antihelminthics for soil-transmitted helminths during the second or third trimester of pregnancy on maternal anaemia and pregnancy outcomes. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (31 January 2015) and reference lists of retrieved studies. All prospective randomised controlled trials evaluating the effect of administration of antihelminthics during the second or third trimester of pregnancy. Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and risk of bias, extracted data and checked them for accuracy. A total of four trials including 4265 participants were included in this review. Two of the included trials were of high quality, while two were of relatively low quality with limitations and biases in design and conduct.Analysis showed that administration of a single dose of antihelminthic in the second trimester of pregnancy is not associated with any impact on maternal anaemia in the third trimester (risk ratio (RR) 0.94; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.81 to 1.10; 3266 participants; four trials; low quality evidence). Subgroup analysis on the basis of co-interventions other than antihelminthic, which included iron supplementation given to both groups was also not associated with any impact on maternal anaemia (RR 0.76; 95% CI 0.47 to 1.23; 1290 participants; three trials; moderate quality evidence). No impact was found for the outcomes of low birthweight (RR 1.00; 95% CI 0.79 to 1.27; 3255 participants; three trials; moderate quality evidence), preterm birth (RR 0.88; 95% CI 0.43 to 1.78; 1318 participants; two trials, moderate quality evidence) and perinatal mortality (RR 1.09; 95% CI 0.71 to 1.67; 3385 participants; two trials; moderate quality evidence). None of the included studies reported impact on infant survival at six months of age. The evidence to date is insufficient to recommend use of antihelminthic for pregnant women after the first trimester of pregnancy. More well-designed, large scale randomised controlled trials are needed to establish the benefit of antihelminthic treatment during pregnancy.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 232 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 4 2%
United States 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 225 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 38 16%
Researcher 35 15%
Student > Bachelor 29 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 29 13%
Student > Postgraduate 20 9%
Other 37 16%
Unknown 44 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 76 33%
Nursing and Health Professions 35 15%
Social Sciences 19 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 2%
Other 34 15%
Unknown 51 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2020.
All research outputs
#3,092,351
of 17,356,510 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#5,798
of 11,661 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#45,840
of 238,085 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#156
of 254 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,356,510 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 81st percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,661 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 25.0. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 238,085 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 254 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.