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Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

Low versus high haemoglobin concentration threshold for blood transfusion for preventing morbidity and mortality in very low birth weight infants

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, November 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (67th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
6 X users
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
156 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
298 Mendeley
Title
Low versus high haemoglobin concentration threshold for blood transfusion for preventing morbidity and mortality in very low birth weight infants
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, November 2011
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd000512.pub2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Robin Whyte, Haresh Kirpalani

Abstract

Background: Infants of very low birth weight often receive multiple transfusions of red blood cells, usually in response to predetermined haemoglobin or haematocrit thresholds. In the absence of better indices, haemoglobin levels are imperfect but necessary guides to the need for transfusion. Chronic anaemia in premature infants may, if severe, cause apnoea, poor neurodevelopmental outcomes or poor weight gain.On the other hand, red blood cell transfusion may result in transmission of infections, circulatory or iron overload, or dysfunctional oxygen carriage and delivery. Objectives: To determine if erythrocyte transfusion administered to maintain low as compared to high haemoglobin thresholds reduces mortality or morbidity in very low birth weight infants enrolled within three days of birth. Search methods: Two review authors independently searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library) , MEDLINE,EMBASE, and conference proceedings through June 2010. Selection criteria: We selected randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the effects of early versus late, or restrictive versus liberal erythrocyte transfusion regimes in low birth weight infants applied within three days of birth, with mortality or major morbidity as outcomes.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 298 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 <1%
Spain 2 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 291 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 35 12%
Other 32 11%
Student > Bachelor 32 11%
Researcher 28 9%
Student > Postgraduate 26 9%
Other 70 23%
Unknown 75 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 135 45%
Nursing and Health Professions 26 9%
Social Sciences 14 5%
Psychology 6 2%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 2%
Other 25 8%
Unknown 87 29%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 January 2024.
All research outputs
#2,340,148
of 25,457,297 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#4,786
of 11,499 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#12,061
of 155,205 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#50
of 155 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,457,297 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,499 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 40.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 155,205 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 155 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.