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Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

Fetal electrocardiogram (ECG) for fetal monitoring during labour

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (61st percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
policy
2 policy sources
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2 X users
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3 Facebook pages

Citations

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83 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
344 Mendeley
Title
Fetal electrocardiogram (ECG) for fetal monitoring during labour
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, December 2015
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd000116.pub5
Pubmed ID
Authors

James P Neilson

Abstract

Hypoxaemia during labour can alter the shape of the fetal electrocardiogram (ECG) waveform, notably the relation of the PR to RR intervals, and elevation or depression of the ST segment. Technical systems have therefore been developed to monitor the fetal ECG during labour as an adjunct to continuous electronic fetal heart rate monitoring with the aim of improving fetal outcome and minimising unnecessary obstetric interference. To compare the effects of analysis of fetal ECG waveforms during labour with alternative methods of fetal monitoring. The Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (latest search 23 September 2015) and reference lists of retrieved studies. Randomised trials comparing fetal ECG waveform analysis with alternative methods of fetal monitoring during labour. One review author independently assessed trials for inclusion and risk of bias, extracted data and checked them for accuracy. One review author assessed the quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach. Seven trials (27,403 women) were included: six trials of ST waveform analysis (26,446 women) and one trial of PR interval analysis (957 women). The trials were generally at low risk of bias for most domains and the quality of evidence for ST waveform analysis trials was graded moderate to high. In comparison to continuous electronic fetal heart rate monitoring alone, the use of adjunctive ST waveform analysis made no obvious difference to primary outcomes: births by caesarean section (risk ratio (RR) 1.02, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.96 to 1.08; six trials, 26,446 women; high quality evidence); the number of babies with severe metabolic acidosis at birth (cord arterial pH less than 7.05 and base deficit greater than 12 mmol/L) (average RR 0.72, 95% CI 0.43 to 1.20; six trials, 25,682 babies; moderate quality evidence); or babies with neonatal encephalopathy (RR 0.61, 95% CI 0.30 to 1.22; six trials, 26,410 babies; high quality evidence). There were, however, on average fewer fetal scalp samples taken during labour (average RR 0.61, 95% CI 0.41 to 0.91; four trials, 9671 babies; high quality evidence) although the findings were heterogeneous and there were no data from the largest trial (from the USA). There were marginally fewer operative vaginal births (RR 0.92, 95% CI 0.86 to 0.99; six trials, 26,446 women); but no obvious difference in the number of babies with low Apgar scores at five minutes or babies requiring neonatal intubation, or babies requiring admission to the special care unit (RR 0.96, 95% CI 0.89 to 1.04, six trials, 26,410 babies; high quality evidence). There was little evidence that monitoring by PR interval analysis conveyed any benefit of any sort. The modest benefits of fewer fetal scalp samplings during labour (in settings in which this procedure is performed) and fewer instrumental vaginal births have to be considered against the disadvantages of needing to use an internal scalp electrode, after membrane rupture, for ECG waveform recordings. We found little strong evidence that ST waveform analysis had an effect on the primary outcome measures in this systematic review.There was a lack of evidence showing that PR interval analysis improved any outcomes; and a larger future trial may possibly demonstrate beneficial effects.There is little information about the value of fetal ECG waveform monitoring in preterm fetuses in labour. Information about long-term development of the babies included in the trials would be valuable.

X Demographics

X Demographics

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 344 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Ethiopia 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 342 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 45 13%
Student > Bachelor 45 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 34 10%
Researcher 25 7%
Other 23 7%
Other 58 17%
Unknown 114 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 118 34%
Nursing and Health Professions 25 7%
Engineering 19 6%
Psychology 12 3%
Social Sciences 10 3%
Other 38 11%
Unknown 122 35%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 19. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 March 2020.
All research outputs
#1,947,457
of 25,655,374 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#4,165
of 13,151 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#31,850
of 397,604 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#100
of 265 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,655,374 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 13,151 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 35.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 397,604 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 265 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.