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Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

Melatonin for women in pregnancy for neuroprotection of the fetus

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, March 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (64th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
20 tweeters
facebook
10 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
30 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
200 Mendeley
Title
Melatonin for women in pregnancy for neuroprotection of the fetus
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, March 2016
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd010527.pub2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dominic Wilkinson, Emily Shepherd, Euan M Wallace

Abstract

Melatonin is an antioxidant with anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects. Animal studies have supported a fetal neuroprotective role for melatonin when administered maternally. It is important to assess whether melatonin, given to the mother, can reduce the risk of neurosensory disabilities (including cerebral palsy) and death, associated with fetal brain injury, for the preterm or term compromised fetus. To assess the effects of melatonin when used for neuroprotection of the fetus. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (31 January 2016). We planned to include randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing melatonin given to women in pregnancy (regardless of the route, timing, dose and duration of administration) for fetal neuroprotection with placebo, no treatment, or with an alternative agent aimed at providing fetal neuroprotection. We also planned to include comparisons of different regimens for administration of melatonin. Two review authors planned to independently assess trial eligibility, trial quality and extract the data. We found no randomised trials for inclusion in this review. One study is ongoing. As we did not identify any randomised trials for inclusion in this review, we are unable to comment on implications for practice at this stage.Although evidence from animals studies has supported a fetal neuroprotective role for melatonin when administered to the mother during pregnancy, no trials assessing melatonin for fetal neuroprotection in pregnant women have been completed to date. However, there is currently one ongoing randomised controlled trial (with an estimated enrolment target of 60 pregnant women) which examines the dose of melatonin, administered to women at risk of imminent very preterm birth (less than 28 weeks' gestation) required to reduce brain damage in the white matter of the babies that were born very preterm.Further high-quality research is needed and research efforts should directed towards trials comparing melatonin with either no intervention (no treatment or placebo), or with alternative agents aimed at providing fetal neuroprotection (such as magnesium sulphate for the very preterm infant). Such trials should evaluate maternal and infant short- and longer-term outcomes (including neurosensory disabilities such as cerebral palsy), and consider the costs of care.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 20 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 200 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
South Africa 1 <1%
Unknown 199 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 39 20%
Student > Bachelor 28 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 11%
Researcher 17 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 5%
Other 30 15%
Unknown 54 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 61 31%
Nursing and Health Professions 27 14%
Neuroscience 10 5%
Psychology 8 4%
Social Sciences 8 4%
Other 24 12%
Unknown 62 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 26. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 January 2022.
All research outputs
#1,172,241
of 21,592,997 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#2,759
of 12,079 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#21,760
of 279,615 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#70
of 193 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,592,997 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 12,079 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 29.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 279,615 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 193 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.