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Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews

Anti‐tuberculous therapy for maintenance of remission in Crohn's disease

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, July 2016
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)

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Title
Anti‐tuberculous therapy for maintenance of remission in Crohn's disease
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, July 2016
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd000299.pub3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Petrease H Patton, Claire E Parker, John K MacDonald, Nilesh Chande

Abstract

There have been a number of studies with conflicting results which have examined the effect of anti-tuberculous therapy in Crohn's disease. A meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the use of anti-tuberculous therapy for the maintenance of remission in Crohn's disease. To evaluate the effects of anti-tuberculous therapy for the maintenance of remission in patients with Crohn's disease. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane LIbrary, and the Cochrane IBD Group Specialized Register from inception to June 22, 2015. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of anti-tuberculous therapy compared to placebo or another active therapy in patients with quiescent Crohn's disease were considered for inclusion. At least two authors independently extracted data and assessed the quality of included studies using the Cochrane risk of bias tool. We calculated the risk ratio (RR) and corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) for dichotomous outcomes.. The primary outcome was relapse. Secondary outcomes included adverse events, withdrawals due to adverse events and serious adverse events. All data were analyzed on an intention-to-treat basis. The overall quality of the evidence supporting the primary and secondary outcomes was evaluated using the GRADE criteria. Four placebo-controlled RCTs including 206 participants were included. Three trials included an 8 to 16 week induction phase with tapering corticosteroids (prednisone, prednisolone or methylprednisolone) as induction therapy. Anti-tuberculous therapy included monotherapy with clofazimine, combination therapy with clofazimine, rifampin, ethambutol, and dapsone or combination therapy with clarithromycin, rifabutin and clofazimine. All of the studies were rated as unclear risk of bias for allocation concealment, three were rated as unclear risk of bias for random sequence generation and two were rated as unclear risk of bias for blinding or participants and personnel. There was a statistically significant difference in relapse rates favoring anti-tuberculous therapy over placebo. Thirty-nine per cent (44/112) of patients in the anti-tuberculous therapy group relapsed at 9 months to 2 years compared to 67% (63/94) of placebo patients (RR 0.58, 95% CI 0.45 to 0.75, I(2) = 47%). A GRADE analysis indicates that the overall quality of the evidence supporting this outcome was very low due to unknown risk of bias and sparse data. Adverse events occurred more frequently in the anti-tuberculous therapy group (37/159) compared to the placebo group (14/163) with a pooled RR of 2.57 (95% CI 1.45 to 4.55; N=322; studies=4, I(2)=64%). A GRADE analysis indicates that the overall quality of the evidence supporting this outcome was very low due to unknown risk of bias, unexplained heterogeneity and sparse data. There was no difference in withdrawals due to adverse events. Nine per cent (14/159) of anti-tuberculous therapy patients withdrew due to adverse events compared to 7% (11/163) of placebo patients (RR 1.29, 95% CI 0.60 to 2.77, I(2) = 0%). Common adverse events included increased skin pigmentation and rashes. No serious adverse events were reported in any of the included studies. Anti-tuberculous therapy may provide a benefit over placebo for the prevention of relapse in participants with Crohn's disease in remission. However, this result is very uncertain due to unclear study quality and the small numbers of patients assessed. Further studies are needed to provide better quality evidence for the use of anti-tuberculous therapy for maintaining remission in people with quiescent Crohn's disease.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 132 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Chile 1 <1%
Qatar 1 <1%
Unknown 130 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 19 14%
Researcher 17 13%
Other 10 8%
Student > Bachelor 10 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 6%
Other 32 24%
Unknown 36 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 41 31%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 5%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 6 5%
Computer Science 6 5%
Other 23 17%
Unknown 40 30%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 July 2021.
All research outputs
#6,862,283
of 25,386,051 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#8,393
of 12,552 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#109,184
of 377,989 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#150
of 197 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,386,051 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 12,552 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 37.0. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 377,989 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 197 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.